Justin Bieber Is Helping the East Coast Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy and So Can You

Justin Bieber Phish Covers

Posted by on 11/04/2012 at 10:30 PM News

The Popdust Files: Chris Christie, hurricane Sandy, jonas brothers, justin bieber, twitter

In the days following Hurricane Sandy, music’s biggest names are lending their names and time to the multiple relief efforts. With a strong understanding of the power that comes with a single tweet, much like Liz Lemon and Jack Donaghy, Justin Bieber is letting his 29 million followers know how they can help:

We all know giving back is a huge part of Bieber World, as we’ve seen him donate his time and money to various organizations and individuals over the years. Whether it was the friendly urging of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (who also targeted Garden State-born Jonas Brothers for a little Twitter love), or a mass text command from Scooter Braun to each one of his artists, Bieber tweeted additional plans to help the effort himself. In some way. Logistics are still vague. He’s got a show in Philadelphia to get through tonight.

Details are scant, but The Bieb will be in the New York-New Jersey area by the end of the week: His Believe tour rolls into town with a scheduled show on Friday, November 9 at the Izod Center in East Rutherford, NJ. If his promised generosity, Christina Aguilera’s telethon performance or countless images of the effected areas have left you wanting to do your part—even from thousands of miles away—here are other ways you can contribute.

1. Donate money.

The Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City is currently accepting monetary donations to help those residents in need. You can also make a donation to The Red Cross via text message (“Red Cross” to 90999 and make a $10 donation), phone (1-800-733-2767) or by visiting redcross.org. Cash donations can be mailed to The American Red Cross, P.O. Box 37243, Washington, D.C. 20013. Wells Fargo has given customers the ability to make donations to The Red Cross via its ATM machines, through November 13.

2. Donate time.

For those in the immediate area, there are volunteer opportunities to aid various rebuilding projects throughout the city. Visit New York Cares to sign up for  volunteer projects, or visit specific areas greatly affected by the hurricane, including Rockaway, Red Hook and Staten Island. Be sure to confirm any age restrictions that may prohibit you from taking part.

3. Send food, blankets and clothing.

With chilly temperatures expected for the week, outerwear and blankets are needed more than ever. Multiple drop-off locations across the five boroughs are currently accepting donations of flashlights, batteries, candles, baby supplies and warm clothing. Companies can send larger donations through aidmatrix.

4. Spread the word.

Remember the vigor with which Cher Horowitz chaired the Pismo Beach Disaster Relief? Organize and food and clothing drive in your area or fundraising event, where attendees can make contributions. Realizing the extent of the recent gas shortage, Dayana Bustamante and students at Franklin High School created an interactive app to notify residents of available fueling locations. Mappler is a digital crowdsourced map that identifies and locates open stations in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania with power and gas. The app is currently available for download on iPhone and Android.

You can always pull a Governor Christie and put those hours spent on social media sites to good use by flooding your timeline and newsfeed encouraging friends and classmates to do their part.

5. Encourage your friends and family to visit New York City.

Things are slowly getting back to normal, with power being restored to nearly 200,000 New Yorkers. Spend some time and money helping the city get back on its feet, by taking a trip to the Big Apple and enjoy the culture, food and nightlife we’re most known for, pumping funds into a city whose businesses were largely shut down for the better part of a week. While there is still a tremendous amount of work to be done, New York should never be a place one is afraid to visit.

 

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